On this episode of your right to speak Salvatore talks with Deirdre Carroll on the topic of mindfulness practice. Deirdre has 12 years of experience in the social work field and youth and women and is a registered Psychotherapist who has extensively travelled to India to learn yoga instruction and other alternative health practices. Deirdre and Salvatore start the conversation speaking to how the word mindfulness has become a buzzword. The conversation then turns to what is mindfulness practice and offers advice to people entering the field of social work who are facilitating mindfulness. Let’s Raise Awareness Together!

If you would like you and contact Deirdre through Facebook at https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=531936134000846&ref=content_filter

Or Instagram at deeserendipity44

Melanie Doucet and Harrison Pratt discuss the Photovoice research project titled Relationships Matter for Youth “Aging Out” of Care (https://www.yumpu.com/document/view/59918518/relationships-matter-e-book). Melanie and Harrison are both researchers with direct experience living in the child welfare system. In this episode, part 1 of a two-part conversation, we talk about the genesis and intention behind the project, aspects of the 12 findings from the research, and their thought on the meaning of care.

To learn more about the project please visit:

Relationships Matter Project video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5lmPDZ360ow&t=40s

·         Relationships Matter Photo E-Book: https://www.yumpu.com/document/view/59918518/relationships-matter-e-book

·         Relationships Matter Executive Summary + Research report (child welfare policy & practice oriented), published via the BC Representative for Children and Youth: https://rcybc.ca/reports-and-publications/reports/relationships-matter-youth-aging-out-care

 ·         Megaphone Magazine cover story and article, January 2019, What do YOUth think? Research project that aims to improve B.C.'s foster care system goes straight to the source.

·         Tyee article, December 13, 2018, Want to fix foster care? Ask kids who have been through the system

·         Tyee article, December 15, 2017, Creating Connections Through Photography

On this episode of Your Right To Speak Salvatore talks with Rima Dib who is the director of curriculum and education at Harmony At Work.  The topic of the conversation is shaming and moving to a place of education with regard to anti-oppression. Rima explains the importance of not shaming people and the benefit of it. She offers an example of what shaming looks like and what a place of education looks like. Let’s Raise Awareness Together!  

In this conversation Dennis Long speaks about adolescent substance use, if substance use is of concern (and why), the impacts of changing cannabis laws, opiate overdoses, harm reduction, and how to support parents

 

Dennis Long is the Former President of the Ontario Federation of Community Addictions and Mental Health Programs, the past Executive Director, of Breakaway Substance Abuse Treatment Centre, and a current teacher, educator, and activist related to substance use.

 

 

On today’s episodes of  A Right to Speak  Salvatore talks with returning guest Alyssa. Alyssa is current a masters student at Ryerson’s Child and Youth care program. Alyssa will be talking to us about some her research regarding her thesis which she is currently conducting. Alyssa will be explaining to us how youth in care need a better system put in place for their transitional periods. Thank you Alyssa and we hope to have you on the show once your thesis is complete.  

 

This episode is a recording made at the 22nd South African National Association of Child and Youth Care & 4th CYC-Net world conference, which took place in Durban South Africa of June 2019. The presenter was Werner van der Westhuizen, from Port Elizabeth, South Africa 
 
The following is the conference abstract:
“During 2018 the presenter, a former director at a residential child care centre, was contacted by a number of the former residents via Facebook wishing to reconnect with each other. As discussions started regarding a possible reunion, the presenter was struck by how the perspectives of these young people have changed and evolved over the past couple of years and suggested to them having discussions about their views and experiences. Following an overwhelmingly positive response, a series of conversations were arranged where both these young people and former director “come full circle” as for the first time, they talk honestly about their relationships and experiences with each other years after they left the residential care centre. 
This presentation offers the highlights from these discussions as a process of mutual meaning-making unfolded between the former director and the young people. Some of the highlights of these discussions include their views on aspects of child and youth care work that affected them, such as de-institutionalisation, residential child care workers versus shift workers, the absence of male role models, structure and routines and values. As they reflect on their childhood while in residential care and how their experiences of independent living have evolved their perspectives on child residential care, many express a desire to “return to their home” and become involved in the care of children now in residential care. Now adults, they also considered how these experiences contributed to their own value systems and shaped the way they view both their past and the future, the society they wish to live in and how they want to shape society for future generations. 
The views and experiences of these young people offer additional insights and possible practice implications for practitioners in the child and youth care field.”

This episode is a recording made at the 22nd South African National Association of Child and Youth Care & 4th CYC-Net world conference, which took place in Durban South Africa of June 2019. The presenters were: Professor Paul Cooke, Dr Lou Harvey, Martin Keat and three Child and Youth Care Practitioners from Leth’ithemba Isibindi Safe Park, Vosloorus, Ekurhuleni.

 

The following is the conference abstract”

“Since 2016, the University of Leeds in the UK has been working with the Bishop Simeon Trust in Ekurhuleni, using arts-based projects to develop and sustain ‘Youth Committees’ in a number of Isibindi Safe Parks across the region. These projects have helped to build the confidence of the young people they support, on the one hand, and also helped the Safe Parks access state funding, on the other (for which having a functioning ‘Youth Committee’ is obligatory). Specifically, these Youth Committees have used a range of art forms – including theatre, music, dance, ‘grass-roots comics’ and participatory filmmaking – to organise ‘advocacy campaigns’ that have raised awareness of a range of issues that are important to the young people who use the safe parks, but that they feel tend to be ignored or misrepresented in their communities.

 

In so doing, this work has highlighted to a group of young people who are frequently either ignored by, or seen as a problem for, their communities the potential of their voice and its power to help them effect change in their lives for themselves. In 2019, the various Safe Parks we work with will be focusing on the question ‘What does my Safe Park mean to me?’ and will be developing a joint campaign to raise awareness of the role played by Isibindi Safe Parks in their communities.

 

The aim of our presentation is twofold. First, it will showcase the work of the young people involved in the Youth Committees we have supported, providing them with a national platform for their activities and a significant opportunity to highlight the potential of their voice. Second it will present a set of training materials we are developing for other Isibindi Safe Parks interested in using arts-based methods to create and sustain their youth committees.”

 

The following is the presentation write up from the July I had the pleasure of attending the 22nd South African National Association of Child and Youth Care & 4th CYC-Net world conference in Durban South Africa:

How Can I Be Homeless When I Just Left One? An Observation from Working on the Streets of Pietermaritzburg with Young People by Thamsanqa Gcwabaza & Rob Ng-Yu-Tin, from Life Changer

“What do we mean by the word home? Is it a house? An address? A bed to sleep in? A family? Perhaps we need to explore what we mean by homeless and perhaps consider it as ‘houseless’. We are living in the aftermath of the HIV Pandemic. Our reality now is an emerging group of older vulnerable youth and young adults who are making a living off the streets. Many of these predominantly young men have lived in multiple homes, had an array of significant care givers, and been in informal kinship care or formal foster care. Some have been adopted and even lived in residential care. But now? They find them themselves without a family, with no idea of who to turn to, ask for advice and seek refuge. They are seen as beggars, filthy down-and-outs who have made bad choices. We have even heard them referred to as vermin. These young adults were possibly once celebrated as newborns. A celebration to a family. They grew up being offered some love, and family. Where do these young people go once faced with huge hardship? Huge emotional psychological and behavioural problems. All desperate for love, affirmation and a family. To add to that child and youth care centres struggle to want to accept these children in care, and social workers don’t know what to do.

On this episode of Your Right to Speak Salvatore talks with youth who are part of Olori. Olori is a project formed by multiple organizations that work with Black youth around Blackness and identity. The focus on this episode is on anti-Black racism in the school system. Sharifa, Lukman, Isaiahm, Pikmen in the episode are candid about their experiences in the school system and how they have seen and experienced discrimination. The conversation then turns the topic of du-rags and how their school has banned on them. The interviewees explain what du-rags mean to them and how society sees them. Please note: since the episode was recorded the school has lifted their ban on du-rags from a petition students started. Let’s Raise Awareness Together!  

Johana, Khyna, Edward, and Cody from the Surrey You Advisory Committee (YAC) talk about what brought them to the YAC, what it has accomplished over two years, thoughts & suggestions for new practitioners/students, and some of the challenges facing Youth Advisory Committees.

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