This month we are showcasing episode 7 from ReFiled, a research-based fiction podcast created with Child and Youth Care practitioners who have residential placement experience. You can listen to the complete series at www.Refiled.ca, or on iTunes , Spotify, and Google Podcasts. 

David Lewis-Pert and Meagan Lindley talk about their work at the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) and the annual YouthCAN conference for young people in the child welfare system. 

This year’s conference title is Beyond Survive: THRIVE! with a focus on topics related to health and wellbeing for young people in and from child protection services. Meagan and David discuss paths to thriving for those in care, ways peers can foster wellbeing, and suggestions for adults who support young people.

Link to YouthCan:

http://www.oacas.org/what-we-do/youthcan/

Our host Wolfgang Vachon's has his own research project/podcast  titled 

ReFiled, a drama inquiry with child and youth care practitioners with residential care experience. 

 

On this episode Chanice McAnuff of (Founder of Project Outsoders) and Vivian Patruno (Producer and Editor) continue their discussion regarding their experience growing up in foster care with social workers and staff. The two reflect on the system gaps in their experience and how social workers and housing staff have the power to impact youth in tremendous ways. 

 

For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.caand https://www.tigweb.org 

Sean Elliott discusses his recently completed study with graduates of college or university programs and who have lived in residential placement. Sean, who identifies as a “foster care alumni” talks about why he used an asset-based approach by focusing on success factors, learnings from the study, and how educators and others can support students with residential care histories.

This conversation is a follow-up to our discussion last month about ReFiled an audio drama inquiry with child and youth care practitioners with residential care experience, and the conversation series we hosted by Project Outsiders.

On this episode Chanice McAnuff of (founder of Project Outsoders) and Vivian Patruno (Producer and Editor) discuss their experience growing up in foster care with social workers and staff. The two reflect on the system gaps in their experience and how social workers and housing staff have the power to impact youth in tremendous ways. 

 

For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.caand https://www.tigweb.org 

 

In this episode, Wolfgang speaks with Krysten Bonikowsky and Shannon Cherry, about the research project Tuning into Child and Youth Care: An Audio-Drama Inquiry with Child and Youth Care practitioners who have lived in Residential Care. We begin by talking about the audio drama ReFiled (www.ReFiled.ca), which follows a CYCP from care working in a group home who finds herself in crises after putting a young person into restraint. The audio drama leads to discussions about the role of files in working with young people, what they do and don’t say about the young person, what they reveal about the writer, what it is like to be “from care” and working in the care system, and we end with thoughts about the benefits and limitations of such lived experiences.

To learn more about Tuning into Child and Youth Care and hear the audio drama episodes please visit TuningIntoCYC.org

 

Aaron Crhak talks about the use of video games within child and youth care practice. Exploring games as a way to build relationship, practice life skills, have therapeutic conversations, and develop mastery he elaborates on different games, how he utilizes them, and why he thinks they are effective tools for CYCPs to use with young people. 
 
For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.ca and https://www.tigweb.org 
 
 

In this episode Jeremiah Otis sits down with Salvatore to discuss music based programs in at risk areas. Jeremiah is a youth advocate, musician and producer; he has found peace and happiness in music. His goal is to spread this message to young people from all over. In this episode we find out how imperative youth led music programs can be with the right approach. 

Jeremiah Otis on Instagram: @jotis16 

For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.ca and https://www.tigweb.org 

 

For our season finale, we sat down and had a conversation with Samuel Ashirbekov. He is a transgender female to male and an aspiring advocate for youth in care. Samuel shares with us what it was like transitioning into his new identity while in the child welfare system. He shares the obstacles he faced before, during, and after encountering me (Chanice) in the group home we both lived in. Sam and I both lived in the same group home for a period of time and we reflect on our different experiences within the same space. In this conversation, we learn about what it is like having the system paint your identity and what are some of the current gaps when it comes to youth identifying as a part of the LGBTQ2S+ community. We hope you have enjoyed the first season and have taken something away from each conversation. We ask you to continue to support our movement and content by liking, sharing, and promoting it on your platforms. More is coming soon but until then, we hope you take care and stay safe. 

 

If you want to partner with Samuel here is an email you can contact him by samuel.ashirbekov@gmail.com 

 

Check out the full episode on the CYC podcast available on Spotify  Google play and many other platforms. 

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Welcome back to Project Outsiders. If you are returning, thank you so much for coming back and tuning into our podcast. We really appreciate all of  your support and joining us along on our journey to improving the foster care system. For those who are new here, Welcome to the Foster Care Experience Podcast. We are a youth lead social organization that is trying to bridge the gap between youth in care with decision makers. We are all youth from care who have been pushed by our experience to ensure we see changes to a disconnected system. We are all incredibly passionate advocates and activists and want to create paths and opportunities for youth in care. 

Youth in care don’t have a house to go for holidays, someone who will always be there to lean on. Every human being deserves to have people that care for them unconditionally, not for a paycheck, not until a youth turns 18. Families are always there for each other. Why is child welfare so different? 

Today we are talking about permanency within child welfare. Youth in care experience a lot of abandonment, neglect, and isolation which shapes their interaction in the world well after they leave care. The instability from moving around and the drastic feeling of abandonment youth feel once they turn 18 or 21 leave many youth feeling worthless. We want to learn how youth views the idea of permanency and its impact of attaining it even later in life. To help us with this discussion we have Vivian Patruno. 

Vivian Patruno is a former youth in the child welfare system. She has been involved with the children's Aid since infancy due to parental mental health circumstances.Vivian is a youth advocate, a fitness enthusiast and she is a Producer and Editor. Vivian’s newest endeavor is working with RBC. 

Vivian is undergoing permanency through the NeverTooLate program in partnership with PARC (Pape, Adolescent Resource Centre) She connected with her family when she was 23. What Vivian needs the world to know is that everyone deserves permanency and stability. 

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