Aaron Crhak talks about the use of video games within child and youth care practice. Exploring games as a way to build relationship, practice life skills, have therapeutic conversations, and develop mastery he elaborates on different games, how he utilizes them, and why he thinks they are effective tools for CYCPs to use with young people. 
 
For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.ca and https://www.tigweb.org 
 
 

In this episode Jeremiah Otis sits down with Salvatore to discuss music based programs in at risk areas. Jeremiah is a youth advocate, musician and producer; he has found peace and happiness in music. His goal is to spread this message to young people from all over. In this episode we find out how imperative youth led music programs can be with the right approach. 

Jeremiah Otis on Instagram: @jotis16 

For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.ca and https://www.tigweb.org 

 

For our season finale, we sat down and had a conversation with Samuel Ashirbekov. He is a transgender female to male and an aspiring advocate for youth in care. Samuel shares with us what it was like transitioning into his new identity while in the child welfare system. He shares the obstacles he faced before, during, and after encountering me (Chanice) in the group home we both lived in. Sam and I both lived in the same group home for a period of time and we reflect on our different experiences within the same space. In this conversation, we learn about what it is like having the system paint your identity and what are some of the current gaps when it comes to youth identifying as a part of the LGBTQ2S+ community. We hope you have enjoyed the first season and have taken something away from each conversation. We ask you to continue to support our movement and content by liking, sharing, and promoting it on your platforms. More is coming soon but until then, we hope you take care and stay safe. 

 

If you want to partner with Samuel here is an email you can contact him by samuel.ashirbekov@gmail.com 

 

Check out the full episode on the CYC podcast available on Spotify  Google play and many other platforms. 

Follow our socials 

https://linktr.ee/project.outsiders

Instagram 

Twitter 

LinkedIn

Facebook

 

Want to know how to get involved or support our mission? Subscribe to our patron to get exclusive content and discounts on our merchandise.

Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/projectoutsiders

 

Website – www.projectoutsiders.com

Want to know what programs are available in your community? Check out our blog. We are constantly updating our page with new local programs, news, and policy changes. You can also learn about your rights and supports that are afforded to you by the government. Click here to find out more. (here will be a hyperlink)

 

Welcome back to Project Outsiders. If you are returning, thank you so much for coming back and tuning into our podcast. We really appreciate all of  your support and joining us along on our journey to improving the foster care system. For those who are new here, Welcome to the Foster Care Experience Podcast. We are a youth lead social organization that is trying to bridge the gap between youth in care with decision makers. We are all youth from care who have been pushed by our experience to ensure we see changes to a disconnected system. We are all incredibly passionate advocates and activists and want to create paths and opportunities for youth in care. 

Youth in care don’t have a house to go for holidays, someone who will always be there to lean on. Every human being deserves to have people that care for them unconditionally, not for a paycheck, not until a youth turns 18. Families are always there for each other. Why is child welfare so different? 

Today we are talking about permanency within child welfare. Youth in care experience a lot of abandonment, neglect, and isolation which shapes their interaction in the world well after they leave care. The instability from moving around and the drastic feeling of abandonment youth feel once they turn 18 or 21 leave many youth feeling worthless. We want to learn how youth views the idea of permanency and its impact of attaining it even later in life. To help us with this discussion we have Vivian Patruno. 

Vivian Patruno is a former youth in the child welfare system. She has been involved with the children's Aid since infancy due to parental mental health circumstances.Vivian is a youth advocate, a fitness enthusiast and she is a Producer and Editor. Vivian’s newest endeavor is working with RBC. 

Vivian is undergoing permanency through the NeverTooLate program in partnership with PARC (Pape, Adolescent Resource Centre) She connected with her family when she was 23. What Vivian needs the world to know is that everyone deserves permanency and stability. 

Sophia Yang speaks with Wolfgang about Threading Change, “a youth-led not-for-profit organization envisioning a future where fashion is ethical and circular, rooted in justice with climate, gender, and racial equity at the forefront.” In this motivating conversation Sophia discusses relationships between fashion, racism, environmental destruction, and what can be done to change these current realities.

This conversation is part of our ongoing partnership with Taking it Global

 

For more information on the programs we provide visit: http://risingyouth.ca 

 

See here for more information about Threading Change

 

GET INVOLVED WITH THREADING CHANGE: 

1. Join #ClothesBusters month: Threading Change's Spring Cleaning educational campaign here to demystify and bust popular clothing myths! 

2. Threading Change is hiring! (unpaid for now, paid to start in summer)

3. Sign up for Threading Change's newsletter to get resources and stay up to date with local campaigns 

 

OTHER WAYS TO GET INVOLVED: 

1. Join the global Fashion Revolution Week and ask: #WHOMADEMYCLOTHES? (Fashion Revolution's website also has tons of other great reading, organizing, and campaigning resources as well!)

2. Join the #PayUp movement

3. Check out Slow Factory Foundation's AMAZING Fashion Education courses for BIPOC

4. Sign the petition to end Uyghur forced labour in China

 

READINGS/RESOURCES: 

1. Blog post Sophia wrote on why we need to start Threading Change 

2. Threading Change's global launch webinar

3. How to Buy Clothes Built to Last by Kendra Pierre-Louis

4. Vox article: Why is it so hard for clothing manufacturers to pay a living wage

5. Gone Thrifting: How to Build A Better Thrifting System by Emily Stochl

6. What A Waste 2.0: A Global Snapshot of Solid Waste Management to 2050

7. Global Fashion Agenda's Fashion on Climate report

 

PODCASTS/FILMS: 

1. Film: Unravel 

2. The True Cost (all on Youtube for free!) 

3. Conscious Chatter 

4. Wardrobe Crisis 

5. Fashion is a great teacher

Welcome back to Project Outsiders. If you are returning, thank you so much for coming back and tuning into our podcast. We really appreciate all of  your support and joining us along on our journey to improving the foster care system. For those who are new here, Welcome to the Foster Care Experience Podcast. We are a youth lead social organization that is trying to bridge the gap between youth in care with decision makers. We are all youth from care who have been pushed by our experience to ensure we see changes to a disconnected system. We are all incredibly passionate advocates and activists and want to create paths and opportunities for youth in care.

In today's conversation we want to talk about mental health and the use of substances. For a lot of youth in care that is the number one tool we would resort to as a way to cope with our situation. It is not often that we have people in our life that are able to teach us healthy coping skills so we go with the ones taught to us by our peers who are also struggling. This becomes a complicated cycle to get out of once it has been habituated into your daily routine. When mental health becomes more of an issue the more easy it is for youth to fall deeper into an addiction. There are a lot of stigmas that come with having an addiction and today we want to learn more about how to prevent and overcome them. Here to tell us about her journey overcoming a global pandemic is Keona Sehmi.

(Keona’s Bio)

Keona Sehmi is a first voice advocate and participates in numerous committees as a youth advisor. Some of the committees she sits on includes the youth for change steering committee with OACAS, youth said through Halton CAS, She is an advisor for OACAS covid-19 mental health toolkit, and she is a peer mentor for the futures life skills and mentorship program. She plans to take a year off after she graduates for self growth and recovery, but plans to go to school for nursing to become a psychiatric nurse at mohawk. 

Check out the full episode on the CYC podcast available on Spotify  Google play as well as all other platforms.
 
Follow our socials:
 
 
Want to know how to get involved or support our mission? Subscribe to our patron to get exclusive content and discounts to our merchandise.
 
 
Want to know what programs are available in your community? Check out our blog. We are constantly updating our page with new local programs, news, and policy changes. You can also learn about your rights and supports that are afforded to you by the government. 

 

 

On this week’s episode we have Vivian Patruno interviews one of our last guest of the season Saif Khan a youth a part of the My Voice, a magazine and ngo focused on the Muslim Community. Saif talks about his experience with #RisingYouth and how they helped him with developing their quarter one program called My Voice Academy, an Open Mic event. Saif goes over how they developed their Youth Journalism and Media workshop to help educate youth on how they can increase their advocacy capacity.

 

@myvoicecanada on Instagramb

www.myvoicecanada.com 

www.issuu.com/myvoicecanada 

www.youtube.com/channel/UC9szM33a4gomsN0KT7rr6Ag 

www.twitter.com/myvoicecanada 

 

For more informations about the programs we offer please visit https://www.risingyouth.ca 

Children’s Aid societies are beginning to recognize the importance of the inclusion of youth voices and participating in conversations surrounding the barriers and areas of needed improvement within the child welfare system. We are seeing more collaborations between youth and agencies to develop a strategy to redesign Children's Aid, along with putting in place proper safety outlets for youth to safely advocate for themselves.  First voice advocates are youth with first hand experience in child welfare who are driven to see changes within the system. One tool which was developed for the youth was the Advocacy office, which is closed (officially closed back in 2018). That impact weighs greatly on many people from care, especially current youth. Today, we have Christopher Cottle who worked at the advocacy office as a youth Communications Amplifier and is here to speak on his experience and give his insight into what he feels needs to change.
 
Christopher’s plugs
 
 
Rising Youth and CYC
Check out the full episode on the CYC podcast available on Spotify  Google play and many other platforms.
 
Follow our socials
https://linktr.ee/project.outsiders
 
Want to know how to get involved or support our mission? Subscribe to our patron to get exclusive content and discounts to our merchandise.

The last known residential home for Indigenous people closed down in 1996, “it wasn’t that long ago” says Kia Lesage. A lot of damage has been done on the indegenious community and we can see its reflection in the child welfare system. It may not come as a surprise to you but Child Protection Services look very different the further you go from the city or more densely populated areas. The programming and supports are very limited in rural areas and youth are heavily affected by its unavailability. Things like addiction and mental health programs are scarce and these necessary programs are more needed than children’s Aid  intervention and separation of children from their community. Today we hear and learn from kia who shares her story and insight to solutions. 

 

Kia’s Socials 

 

Check out the full episode on the CYC podcast available on Spotify  Google play and many other platforms. 

Follow our socials 

https://linktr.ee/project.outsiders

Instagram 

Twitter 

LinkedIn

Facebook

 

Want to know how to get involved or support our mission? Subscribe to our patron to get exclusive content and discounts to our merchandise.

Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/projectoutsiders

 

Website – www.projectoutsiders.com

Want to know what programs are available in your community? Check out our blog. We are constantly updating our page with new local programs, news, and policy changes. You can also learn about your rights and supports that are afforded to you by the government. 

On this Episode of #RisingYouth Salvatore speaks with Riya Mehta founder of FutureShot Factory 

 

This platform of websites is meant to educate students, especially young adults about the importance of combining SDG based issues with the use of technology for social good and change. The idea came to fruition when I realized that information isnt broken down properly for youth to understand, and being young myself I wanted a platform I could turn to better understand social impact goals through the lens of technology. During my years at The Knowledge Society (a teen accelerator program) I built this idea by constructing different websites, each tackling a different SDG goal by solving it with technology. Right now, I have around 3-4 active websites that discuss the importance of SDG goals with innovation, hosted on the domain futureshotfactory.com under projects. The future of this platform will contain more opportunities for youth go interact with social justice mentors to receive the help they need and design better solutions to problems.

 

For more information on the programs we provide please visit https://www.risingyouth.ca and https://www.tigweb.org 

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